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General Power of Attorney

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General Power of Attorney

General Power of Attorney

General power of attorney is a legal document through which authority is passed from one person to another to give financial, legal, medical, business and personal decision on behalf of the other person. The person who gives the power of attorney is called principal and the person who gets power of attorney is called agent.

Documents Required Why Legal Door ?
  • Name and details of the parties
  • Powers that are being handed over to the designated person
  • Validity of the POA
  • Signature of the donor.

A POA is made up of numerous legal phrases and clauses. A badly written POA might be problematic for the donor since the authorised person may take advantage of it. Therefore, it's crucial that a POA is created in a way that the donor's criteria are met.

A POA must be accurate both legally and factually. It is wise to draught a POA with the assistance of legal professionals who have knowledge in this field.

Legal Door employs legal professionals that are knowledgeable about the process and applicable laws.

We'll make sure all the facts and important information are there.

FAQ

It is required if there is –

  • Physical handicap
  • Travel restrictions
  • Elderly

For power of attorney to be legalised, it is important to get it signed and dated by principal and also to get it notarized.

Yes. The Power of Attorney can be cancelled by the “Revocation of Power of Attorney”.

  • General Power of Attorney: Used when the power of Attorney is granted by a person to his agent to act on behalf of him, generally. It can include, authorisation to operate bank accounts, register property on behalf of the principal etc.
  • Special or Specific Power of Attorney: This type is executed when the principal wishes to grant powers to the Attorney to act on his behalf only for specific tasks/areas.

All powers granted to the Attorney is naturally revoked by law. The Attorney will not be able to act on behalf of the grantor. If there was a Will in place, it will come into force.